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Refashioned Rigel Bomber

I’ve been dreaming and scheming up Rigel Bomber Jackets since the pattern was released earlier this year. Finally I’ve got one to show!

This make was inspired by Amy of Sew Amy Sew. She is hosting a fun ‘Repurpose, Reuse, Rafashion’ challenge during August. I love a good refashion – although I’m still quite a novice. I’ve just managed to sneak this entry in before the August 31st deadline.

Rigel Before & After

 

So, I started with the very stylish old lady dressing gown on the left and ended up with the bomber jacket on the right (above). I found the wool dressing gown at a local op-shop (thrift store) for $8 sometime last year. I had a jacket in mind when I bought it – but I was kinda waiting for my sewing skills to catch up with my ambitions a bit more before I attempted it. Amy’s competition was the motivation I needed to get busy.

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This is the first Papercut Pattern that I’ve sewn. Β I JUST managed to squeeze the pattern pieces out of the dressing gown – raglan sleeves take a lot more fabric than you think. I didn’t have the luxury of pattern matching, although I did match the lines across the zipper….mostly…. πŸ˜‰ As I’m pretty sensitive to itchy woollen fabrics, lining the jacket was a must. I am a little perplexed that a $30 pattern comes without pattern pieces or instructions for lining, but fortunately for us, other sewers have already blogged instructions for how to line your Rigel bomber (see Liz’s post here). Given I had already made a lined jacket, albeit a tiny one, I pretty much just winged it. Fortunately it all turned out ok.

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Given this is a Reusing challenge – the lining is cotton drill left over from this bag. The only thing I purchased specifically to make the jacket was the zip.

On to the pattern: I made the jacket in a small after reading online reviews and I’m happy with the fit. I read that others had lengthened the sleeves and I should have followed this advice too. Other than that (and the fact that it’s not lined), it’s all good! The instructions are adequate and if you’ve made a jacket before, or have some experience with welt pockets and zips, you’ll have no troubles.

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Amy has a Flickr group for all the lovely entries that are part of the competition. Head on over there to see more refashioned creations. In the meantime, I’ll be getting as much wear as I can out of this super warm jacket before it’s too hot to wear it.

How about you, do you like to refashion things?

 

 

KCW Days 5 and 6: It’s Little Betty

Phew – we’re getting there. Apologies to those who don’t come here for the kids sewing – maybe check back in a week or so when this Kids Clothes Week malarchy is over πŸ™‚ I’m seriously loving it though – apparently I respond well when there are parameters added to my projects. Are you the same? Sometimes I find the wealth of possibilities of what to sew next a bit daunting – too much choice in patterns and fabrics, how can one ever decide? But add a timeframe and some limitations and I’m a sewing machine (ha ha). I am continuing with my aim of sewing with up-cycled and stash fabrics during this KCW.

Today I’m blogging a complete rip off. Some of you may remember that I was part of the blog tour for the Little Betty top by Suz of Sewpony Vintage back in January. Also part of that blog tour was Trine of GroovyBabyandMama. She totally knocked everyone’s socks off with her dress adaptation of the Little Betty and I’ve been meaning to copy hersΒ make my own ever since.

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The dress is made from a thrifted ladies roll neck top and the leggings are from leftover knit from my Plantain tee. I used the Little Betty pattern pieces that I had cut out from last time (size 2), but apparently this girl has grown a bit since January (who knew?!) This dress is going to have to be worn NOW as there is not much growing room across her chest.

The leggings are Β made from the Tiny Path leggings pattern from Ottobre 6/2013 that I made for the first time last Kids Clothes Week here. If you can get a quicker or easier sew then I’d like to see it – these are about 15 minutes worth.

It’s the quick or the dead with getting blog photos sometimes – she practically ruined the dress within 5 minutes by covering it and her new leggings in sunscreen. Bless her heart. I’m still working on getting the greasy stains out…..still, it pays to be sun smart πŸ™‚

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KCW Day Two: Petit Coco

I’m very excited to be kicking off Kids Clothes Week properly today – are you sewing along too? If you feel like joining in, you can sign up here and join us by sewing for an hour a day for your kids for one week (this week April 7-13). You can manage that right? You can be as ambitious as you please, or not, what ever you like πŸ™‚

I couldn’t resist sewing one outfit to go along with the ‘mini me’ theme. If you saw my pink Coco top that I posted a few weeks ago then you might already have spotted my inspiration for Miss A’s outfit – that’s right, I made a MINI COCO!

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Mini me is all very well, but I didn’t want to make A’s version exactly the same as mine. Instead I made her a small version of the 60s funnel neck which is one of the options of the Coco pattern. Tilly’s Coco pattern is only in grown up sizes, so to make the petit coco I used Ottobre 1/2014 Owl Princess top in 92cms as the base. I created a boatneck shape and added the funnel neck and I’m pretty thrilled with how it worked out! The fabric is leftover French Terry from my Coco top. In fact, I’ve decided that this KCW is going to be all about recycled, upcycled and stash fabrics – I’m not buying any fabric for any of this weeks projects. This idea was also inspired by Laura, Abby and Celina’s Fashion Revolution sewing flash mob that’s happening this month, which you can read about here.

The jeans are a re-fashion. They were a pair of wide-leg 12-18 month size jeans. They still fit A in the waist but were much too short. To re-fashion the jeans, I created a slim leg and a wide cuff and something that was unwearable is wearable again.

Here’s a very quick how to: (1) use a pair of skinny pants/jeans to get an idea of the shape you want and pin your new seam line (2) baste stitch down the pin line and turn right side out (3) check the fit of the jeans (4) sew the seams with a normal stitch length and overlock/serge seams – Easy!!

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Anyone for tea?

 

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Need some more inspiration? Head over to the Kids Clothes Week site – everyone who’s sewing along will be posting their projects there this week. Come and join the fun πŸ™‚

 

 

It’s a Coco party!

Happy Friday everyone!!

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Did you hear? Tilly’s holding a Coco party to celebrate the release of her latest pattern – the super cute and perfectly drafted Coco top and dress. There will be cocos galore on the sewing internet tonight – cheers!!

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See, I even made the bunting πŸ™‚

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I’m not sure how come this is the first of Tilly’s patterns that I’ve sewn – very slack on my part πŸ™‚ As I’m sure you’re aware, Tilly of Tilly and the Buttons fame is a blogging, TV starring, book writing sewing sensation! The Coco is Tilly’s third pattern release and has breton and 60s influences in the design. There are top and dress length versions, 3/4 and full length sleeve options and also a 60s funnel neck. This top was a cinch to sew and came together easily in a few hours. Tilly has paid a huge amount of attention to detail and her pattern is one of the most professional I’ve ever seen/sewn.

My measurements put me in a size 4-5-4 (bust-waist-hips) so I graded between the two sizes. Next time I’ll just cut a straight size 4 as there is a fair amount of ease. I used a lovely pink French terry knit from a local fabric store, it’s so comfy I’m going back to see if there are any other colours πŸ™‚

Want to see more Cocos? Tilly has a great Pinterest board with so many fantastic versions – inspiration galore!

What are you up to this lovely Friday? I’m hanging out with my little dancing partner πŸ™‚

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A floaty pink blouse – Happy Homemade: Sew Chic Pattern L

There seems to have been far too much kid sewing here on the blog lately – how did that happen? Some pattern testing opportunities and Kids Clothes Week I guess, but, good reasons aside, it’s time to put some balance back. Time to sew something for me πŸ™‚

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I recently pinned this cute top from Anthropologie

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What you may not know is that there are no Anthropologie stores in Australia – I know right……how do we live here??!? Yeh, it’s tough.

I first found Anthro about 5 years ago on a trip to San Francisco and really loved the style. They do ship to oz, but really, the shipping prices don’t make it a viable option. So, what’s a girl to do…….um sew I guess πŸ™‚

Here is my take on Anthro’s Field Midi Blouse using pattern L from Happy Homemade: Sew Chic (a Japanese sewing pattern book for women that is translated into English). I’ve had this book for a few months and I like the patterns, but I do feel they might be too boxy and shapeless. This pattern is for a tunic dress, however, cut off as a short blouse, I think you can still show your curves πŸ™‚

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It’s funny how photos can skew how the fabric looks in real life. This is a polyester georgette with hot pink polka dots – here is a better idea of what it really looks like.

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I made a few modifications to the pattern, which is a one size fits most tunic dress. Obviously I cut the pattern off much shorter than in this picture, I also omitted the sleeves. The side seams needed to be taken in about 1.5 inches to give some shape – I think I could have taken even more than this off, but we’ll see how I like the look of the top as it is over time.

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I was looking for a really neat way to finish the hem as the lightness of the georgette with a regular hem would be very noticeable. I was contemplating trying to figure out how to do a rolled hem on my overlocker/serger, but then I found that I have a really cool narrow hem foot on my sewing machine. WOW is all I can say about that!! So neat and easy to do, I’m seriously in love with this foot – might put a narrow hem on everything from now on πŸ™‚

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Just for interest sake:

Anthro top + shipping = $163 US/$180 AUD

My knock off = $15 AU for material (I used a 40% off voucher for 2.5m of polyester georgette from the local chain fabric store) + $3 AU for thread. The pattern book and the button were from my stash.

What do you think – a successful knock off?